The Chamberlain's Stone Age Museum

Renaissance Man, Chamberlain Niels Frederik Bernhard Sehested, who lived at Broholm 1839-82, had a lifelong interest in antiquities, but only in his old age he got time to do something about it. But then things turn too fast and there was "longed and searched".


The result of N.F.B. Sehested tendon, archaeological zeal can be seen in the 3-leaf museum building as his own drawings were constructed at the south moat in 1878 as Denmark's first museum, built for that purpose. It contains over 60,000 pieces of flint from the Stone Age, neatly arranged by type and time period tilted shelves from floor to ceiling.
The distinctive, 3-winged museum building with skylights and huge gable windows are the ideal setting for Chamberlain's antiquities collection of 60,000 flint tools and other finds.The distinctive, 3-winged museum building with skylights and huge gable windows are the ideal setting for Chamberlain's antiquities collection of 60,000 flint tools and other finds.
As Lord Chamberlain died in 1882, the archaeological activities at Broholm died with him. In 1938 Funen "Stiftsmuseum" bought all Broholm-museum Bronze and Iron Age findings, while the Stone Collection was left untouched until Birgitte Sehested Grice in 1999, on condition that the museum should remain at Broholm, transferred the building and collections for Svendborg Museum, which now has responsibility for this rich, local heritage conservation and to make it available to interested groups.